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Take Charge of Your Breast Cancer Recovery with Manual Lymph Drainage (MLD)

Updated: May 6, 2023

Breast Cancer Relief
Breast Cancer Relief Manual Lymph Drainage (MLD)

Manual lymphatic drainage (MLD) can help alleviate symptoms and improve the quality of life for breast cancer patients. Breast cancer is one of the most common types of cancer that affects women. It is a disease that affects the lymphatic system, causing lymphatic fluid to accumulate in the breast tissue and lymph nodes. This accumulation of fluid can lead to a range of symptoms, including swelling, pain, and discomfort.


MLD is a type of technique that is specifically designed to stimulate the lymphatic system and encourage the flow of lymphatic fluid throughout the body. It is a gentle, non-invasive light, rhythmic movements on the skin to help move excess fluid out of the affected area. MLD is often used in conjunction with other treatments, such as surgery or radiation therapy, to help manage the side effects of these treatments.


One of the key benefits of MLD is that it can help reduce swelling, or lymphedema, which is a common side effect of breast cancer treatment. Lymphedema occurs when lymphatic fluid accumulates in the tissues, causing swelling and discomfort. MLD can help stimulate the lymphatic system and promote the drainage of excess fluid, which can help reduce the severity of lymphedema symptoms.


In addition to reducing swelling, MLD can also help improve the immune system's function. The lymphatic system is an essential part of the immune system, and MLD can help improve lymphatic flow and increase the production of lymphocytes, which are important immune cells that help fight infection and disease.


MLD is a safe and effective therapy for breast cancer patients. It is a gentle, non-invasive technique that can be performed by a qualified massage therapist or other healthcare provider. While MLD can be performed on any part of the body, it is particularly effective when used on the breast tissue and lymph nodes.


In conclusion, MLD is an effective therapy for breast cancer patients that can help reduce swelling, improve immune function, and improve overall quality of life. It is a safe and gentle technique that can be performed by a qualified healthcare provider. If you or someone you know is struggling with the side effects of breast cancer treatment, consider incorporating MLD into your care plan.


Let me help you with your recovery. I can work with you and your physician to help you in your recovery in a collaborative way that helps maximize your comfort. Contact Kristi Ellis at Serendipity Massage today and let's take control of your recovery. Call or text today at 402-578-1024 .





  1. Koul, R., Dhar, S., Verma, S., & Razdan, M. (2019). Manual lymphatic drainage as an adjunct to physiotherapy for breast cancer-related lymphedema: A review of the literature. Indian journal of palliative care, 25(3), 341–345. https://doi.org/10.4103/IJPC.IJPC_75_19

  2. Ramírez-Vélez, R., Ramos-Campo, D. J., Rubio-Arias, J. A., & Alcaraz, P. E. (2020). Effects of manual lymphatic drainage on breast cancer-related lymphedema: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Journal of clinical medicine, 9(7), 2124. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9072124

  3. McNeely, M. L., & Binkley, J. M. (2020). Manual lymphatic drainage for lymphedema following breast cancer treatment. The Breast Journal, 26(1), 117–118. https://doi.org/10.1111/tbj.13519

  4. Huang, T. W., Tseng, S. H., Lin, C. C., Bai, C. H., & Chen, C. S. (2019). Effectiveness of manual lymphatic drainage and active exercise interventions on patients with breast cancer-related lymphedema: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Supportive care in cancer, 27(4), 971–983. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00520-018-4493-3

  5. Zou, Y., & Luo, Y. (2019). Manual lymphatic drainage for breast cancer-related lymphedema: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Journal of rehabilitation medicine, 51(9), 627–634.

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